Impeachment

Impeachment

KCU experts ponder some of the toughest questions in play for the presidency, Congress, public

For just the third time in American history, the U.S. House has impeached a president. In a Wednesday night vote, President Donald Trump was charged with abusing the power of his office for personal political gain. He also was charged with obstructing Congress during the impeachment inquiry into his alleged efforts to solicit re-election help from the president of Ukraine.

The Senate is expected to hold a trial in January to decide whether to acquit or to convict and remove Trump. But with 67 votes required there for conviction, and Senate Republicans holding 53 seats, Trump is expected to remain in office and run for another term.

To gain a deeper understanding of the issues in play and what’s to come, the Gazette asked KCU faculty and affiliates in history, law, politics, government, psychology, and media to offer their thoughts on topics in their fields.

What have you learned from this impeachment episode so far, and how does it compare with the other two you’ve witnessed? Give us some context, please.

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